Prospero Colombiana, Maestro Chimico da Palazzo

Scholar, Misanthrope, Sociopath and Craftsman

Description:

Human Investigator (Mastermind) 5
Lawful Evil Medium Humanoid
Init. +3 Perception +8

Defence

AC 14/17 Touch 13 Flat-footed 11/14 (+3 Dex, +1/ +4 Armour)
hp 32 Fort. +2 Ref. +7 Will +4

Offence

Spd. 30ft
Melee Sword cane +3 (1d6) 2x
Melee Dagger +3 (1d4) 19-20/2x
Melee Spring blade +3 (1d4) 2x
Ranged Dagger +6 (1d4) 19-20/2x 10ft
Ranged Spring blade +6 (1d4) 2x 10ft
Ranged Hand crossbow +6 (1d4) 19-20/2x 30ft
Ranged Wrist launcher +6 (n/a) 20ft

Statistics

Str. 10 Dex. 16 Con. 13 Int. 18 Wis. 10 Cha. 18
Base Attack +3 CMB +3 CMD 16
Feats Brew Potion, Deft Hands, Master Alchemist, Formula Recollection
Skills Craft (Alchemy) +19, Diplomacy +17, Bluff +11, Intimidate +11, Spellcraft +11, Use Magic Device +11, Disable Device +10, Knowledge (Arcana) +10, Knowledge (History) +10, Knowledge (Local) +10, Knowledge (Nobility) +10, Sleight of Hand +10, Disguise +8, Perception +8, Escape Artist +7, Stealth +6, Heal +5, Sense Motive +5, Swim -1
SQ Alchemy, Mastermind’s Inspiration 6/day, A Quiet Word 2/day, Mastermind’s Defence, Poison Lore, Poison Resistance +4, Keen Recollection, Studied Combat, Studied Strike +1d6, Investigator Talents: Concentrate Poison; Lasting Poison

Spells Known

1st-level: Polypurpose Panacaea; Crafter’s Fortune; Keen Senses; Identify; Disguise Self; Vocal Alteration; Heightened Awareness; Cure Light Wounds; Comprehend Languages; Youthful Appearance
2nd-level: Touch Injection; Alchemical Allocation

Spells per day

1st-level: 4 ( +1 bonus)
2nd-level: 2 ( +1 bonus)

Bio:

Though he recognises that his noble birth gave him an initial advantage in life, Prospero Colombiana devoted himself early on to his studies and the tireless pursuit of knowledge, ultimately earning himself a position of wealth and respect distinct from his famiglia. He is a genius, and he knows it, seeing himself as inherently superior to his contemporaries and often feeling like he is owed more than he has — and to that end, he intends to take what is “rightfully” his.

Prospero has a reputation for cold, calculating ruthlessness in political spheres as well as the world of business, and his amazing mind is both respected and feared by his opponents and peers. His primary interest is in alchemy, and he often locks himself in his workshop for days at a time, foregoing food, drink, human contact and even sleep as he pores over tome after tome of ancient lore as if the secrets to life itself are hidden within their pages. His intellectual fervour is hidden in court, when he dons his aloof mask, though doing little to hide the utter contempt that he holds for his contemporaries. Though there is often gossip around court as to his long disappearances and sometimes eccentric behaviour, people know to keep their mouths shut, as anyone found talking out of turn winds up mysteriously being poisoned.

Prospero’s public mask covers the top half of his face and is mostly a plain, subdued colour. Around the eyes, however, is a different story. The defining features of his mask are the defined, furrowed brow, proud cheekbones and pronounced bridge of the nose, and around the eyes are a band of dark colour, almost an exaggeration of his typical symbol of fatigue. The mask is inset with subtly-coloured baroque filigree, and the intent is to hide his own emotions while at the same time, drawing the attention of others to his piercing gaze and imperious expression.

Prospero hates his courtly obligations and only attends when he absolutely has to, preferring to escape to his workshop, a run-down building on a back-street in a rough part of Palazzo. This is his haven, his sanctuary. He knows for a fact that none of his peers would dare to venture here, and so it’s in this building with its heavy iron padlock that Prospero is free to do as he wishes. He has a similar reputation among the people locally — though obviously, he wears a different face to avoid gossip — as a remarkably talented, if somewhat misanthropic, alchemist, and he makes a living selling potions, poisons and cure-alls to the people of the city. He’s particularly well-liked for his “Ask me no questions and I’ll tell you no lies” policy.

Prospero found his education at the Scuola di Carta where he dabbled in many different fields before eventually finding his true interest in alchemy. Their expansive libraries and laboratories gave him a great deal of material with which to experiment, to stretch his mind and expand his abilities. Though he was often suspected of petty theft and unauthorised experimentation with university materials, he was never caught and proved himself a far more capable student than many of his peers. Prospero still considers himself an academic and a scholar despite the fact that his contact with the scuola has been sparse since his departure.

In recent times, Prospero has become increasingly frustrated with what he views as stagnancy. He no longer feels challenged intellectually and he despises the courtiers with their vapid, superficial conversations (but most of all, he despises having to pretend to care). He finds his books more interesting than human company, but there are only so many times you can run through the same volume of alchemical formulae before you know the words by rote and the spine of the book starts falling apart.

He is, to put it simply, bored.

Much of his time is spent black-out drunk, wiling away his time experimenting with the kinds of drugs that other drugs take to get freaky, just waiting. He is listless, counting away the hours until one thing or another appears to capture his imagination.

Prospero Colombiana, Maestro Chimico da Palazzo

Palazzo, the city of canals Skittles Endless_Bunny